Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes and related diseases: risk factors for celiac disease

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This conclusion was drawn by a study in which nearly 200 thousand patients participated. A possible cause is insufficient fiber intake.

Gluten is mainly found in cereals and cereals and gives food products firmness and elasticity. Today, a diet lacking this component remains the only therapeutic technique effective in patients with celiac disease - a genetically predisposed gluten intolerance. Since the limitation of the number of flour products underlies a large number of methods for weight loss, this diet also began to gain popularity among lovers of a healthy lifestyle: according to MedlinePlus, in the United States the number of its adherents tripled from 2009 to 2014.

However, the results of a recently completed study, which analyzed data on the daily gluten intake of more than 199 thousand patients, cast doubt on the benefits of such a diet. According to the findings, people who eat less gluten may be more prone to developing type 2 diabetes. Significant sample sizes (data from three independent studies from 1984 to 2013 were analyzed) suggest a high reliability of the result.

As the analysis showed, the study participants ate up to 12 grams of gluten daily. In total, 15947 cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus were recorded during the observation period. Moreover, among 20% ​​of patients with the lowest gluten content in the diet (usually less than 4 grams per day), this disease developed 13% more often. This relationship remained after adjustments for body weight, heredity, physical activity and other external factors. According to the authors, this may be due to the fact that patients who follow a strict gluten-free diet receive less fiber, which protects the body from diabetes.

“Perhaps those who don’t have celiac disease should reconsider their views on gluten that comes with food,” commented Geng Zong, who led the study. Researchers recommended that people who are not gluten intolerant should pay attention not to its content in food, but to the overall quality of incoming carbohydrates, and to increase the consumption of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Zong and his group will report back to the EPI Lifestyle 2017 Scientific Sessions, which will be held March 7-10 at the initiative of the American Heart Association.

Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease

If the symptoms of celiac disease are pronounced, then this can significantly affect the level of glucose in the blood. There are risks of developing hypoglycemia due to weight loss and malabsorption of carbohydrates. The dose of insulin in this case should be adjusted.

If you follow a gluten-free diet, then over time the need for insulin may increase again. Compensating diabetes is made easier by reducing the incidence of hypoglycemia.

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